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Erotic Romance, Feminism, Ireland, Romance, The Captain's Rebel

THE CAPTAIN’S REBEL IS NOW AVAILABLE!

Dear Readers,

I am so happy to share this book with you today. I will tell you, when I first started writing what would later become THE CAPTAIN’S REBEL, I was in one of those magical creative spaces that can only come from devastating artistic failure. I had been querying what would later become THROUGH THE VEIL, and I had an inbox full of rejections. I decided to change tack and write erotica, a little story I had always wanted to write based on one of my favorite traditional Irish songs, “The Maid That Sleeps in Love.” From the moment I started writing, I knew I had something special. The voice of Mary hit me like a tidal wave, and she wouldn’t let go until I wrote her entire story. Yes, this is a BDSM erotica and the scenes are hot. But the reviews are in, and readers are loving it:

5 Stars: “…by the end of the first few pages I was hooked, and I could not stop turning the pages until the end.” – Stacy Reid, author of Accidentally Compromising the Duke

4 Stars: “If you’re looking for a hot and spicy read, then grab this one!” – Jennifer Theriot, USA Today Bestselling Author

5 Stars: “The sex is HOT and delightfully plentiful, and even better, neither is ashamed of who they are and what they want. (Did I mention the sex is hot? Because oooh boy they have some fun…)” – Nicola Davidson, author of The Devil’s Submission

4 Stars: “Wow this book was hawt. I don’t think I was expecting that but never the less, I really enjoyed it.” – Taylor Bellitto, Goodreads

5 Stars: “Oooh la la!!! Very enjoyable read. Not only is The Captain’s Rebel a racy and saucy dish, it is well-written! Such a delightful change of pace from the dull bits between the hot scenes that you sometimes find in the “bodice ripper” category of romance novels.” – Sue Mendel, Goodreads

4 Stars: “…when I learned there was a cross-dressing heroine topped (ha!) with a sexual submissive plotline, I was sold!…It was total catnip for me, and I can’t wait for more from this author.” – Michaelene Malan, Goodreads

5 Stars: “I loved The Captain’s Rebel, and highly recommend it if you like action-packed adventure on the high seas with strong women, alpha males, heroes, traitors, and pirates mixed with some hot and steamy romance.” – JMH, Goodreads

4 Stars: “I was hooked instantly in this story…This book was not what I was expecting at all! This is 50 Shades of Pirates!” – Micheala, Goodreads

5 Stars: “With a heat level that would make E.L. James’ inner goddess blush and prose that took me away to another time, this was a fantastic read. Twists and turns aplenty.” – Anne Conley, author of the Pierce Securities series

4 Stars: “This is the first book by the author that I have read and it was fast paced, entertaining, and scorching hot! So hot, that I thought my kindle might melt from the heat at various points in the book!” – Kim Tran Kao, Goodreads

I’m pleased to present this book to you, but most of all, I’m excited to share this story of revolution and rebellion, of romanticism and redemption. As some of you know, I wrote my dissertation on the 1798 Irish Uprising, and there is a little piece of that in this book, the culmination of years of work funneled into a tiny, 5’4″ curly-haired, wisp of a woman who refuses to give up. Mary is the kind of heroine a lot of us need right now, and I know you will love her and her  incredible adventure across the sea in the arms of the sexy Captain Grant.

So here is where you can purchase it:

Amazon: https://goo.gl/5Wwpxe
B&N: https://goo.gl/ZRjqMx
iTunes: https://goo.gl/65KQN7
Kobo: https://goo.gl/BT0J1g
Amazon UK: https://goo.gl/0aUpSX
Amazon CA: https://goo.gl/U9o9e4

THE CAPTAIN’S REBEL Blog Tour Giveaway!

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To follow along with the blog tour, you can check the tour schedule HERE.

And make sure you enter the rafflecopter giveaway HERE for a chance to win THE CAPTAIN’S REBEL swag pack.

UPCOMING FACEBOOK TAKEOVERS!

Make sure to RSVP these amazing events…

April 3rd THE CAPTAIN’S REBEL Release Day Party

April 18th An Earl for Every Girl! A Scandalous Release Party

April 25th Brazen and Scorched Fan Club Spring Party!

May 14th at 9pm EST KinkyGirlsBookObsession *After Dark* Facebook Group

May 23rd Only a Viscount Will Do Release Party

Make sure you check out THE CAPTAIN’S REBEL play list, filled with great traditional Irish tunes, sea shanties, and more.

Enjoy!

Entangled Scorched, Erotic Romance, Feminism, Giveaway, Ireland, Release Party, Romance, Social Media, The Captain's Rebel

CAPTAIN’S REBEL RELEASE DAY PARTY!

You all know I love a good party, right?

Well.

It’s only five days (FIVE DAYS!) until the release of THE CAPTAIN’S REBEL, and I couldn’t be more excited! I love this book so much. To me, it has everything–adventure, sex, a strong heroine, a hot Captain, pirates, BDSM-loving lesbians, and sex. Haha! All the hot, kinky, stuck-in-the-Captain’s- cabin sexy times.

You can RSVP HERE!

I’ll be hosting a small party to celebrate on my Facebook author page. I’m going to have tons of giveaways. Jewelry from Silver Beach Sea Glass, free books, gift cards from Feminist Apparel, and a huge big box of hot historical romance paperbacks. If I can figure out Facebook live, I’ll also do a reading.

This event is more than just about THE CAPTAIN’S REBEL. It’s about celebrating all the strong woman in my life who have supported me and the female-centered businesses that keep me inspired. My friend Kathy is the artist behind Silver Beach Sea Glass, and the big box of paperbacks will feature some of my closest lady writer friends who write historical. If you enjoy Captain’s Rebel, you’ll really love their books.

Make sure to put the kiddies to bed beforehand and grab the wine. Can’t wait to see you there!

 

Cover Reveal, Entangled Scorched, Erotic Romance, Giveaway, Ireland, Romance, The Captain's Rebel, Uncategorized

St. Patrick’s Day Giveaway!

St. Patrick’s Day Giveaway!

This is it. My biggest giveaway EVER.

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day and the Upcoming Release of THE CAPTAIN’S REBEL with me! One lucky newsletter subscriber will win a $200 Amazon Gift card. A second lucky subscriber will win signed copies of ALL of my books. Sign up for my newsletter today to participate!

My newsletter goes on March 17th St. Patrick’s Day. Make sure you sign up for a chance to win!

Also, check out the cover for THE CAPTAIN’S REBEL. *Heart Eyes*

This is my first erotic historical romance, and I’m writing as C.B. Halverson. I can’t wait to share this book with you all!

Available April 3rd…

THE CAPTAIN’S REBEL

Never surrender.

Land. Power. Influence. Mary O’Malley knows these are the only things that matter in her war-torn country. Determined to win back her ancestral home, she must embark on a journey across the Atlantic disguised as a cabin boy. But her ruse brings her under the control of a dangerous sea captain who demands from her the one thing she will never give—complete and total submission.

Captain Richard Grant runs a tight ship, and he didn’t claw his way up through the ranks of the Royal Navy to be undone by a headstrong Irish girl hell-bent on jeopardizing his mission and his crew. If she insists on dressing like a man, then she can take his punishments. He demands obedience, but his insatiable need for her leads to a complex game of sex, desire, and dominance not even he can control.

Awakened by the passion Grant stirs in her, Mary finds herself falling for the stern captain. But when her false identity leads to rumors of her spying for the French, she must choose between her love for Ireland and the man who commands her body—and her heart.

“I was hooked, and I could not stop turning the pages until the end.” – Stacy Reid, author of Accidentally Compromising the Duke

Are you ready to rebel?

Available for pre-order at Amazon | B&N | iTunes | kobo | Amazon UK | Amazon Canada
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Creative Process, Ireland, Literature, Uncategorized, Writing

Writing in the Age of Anxiety

When I first started writing commercial fiction, I did what every disciple of Hermione Granger does–I went to the library. I checked out every book on writing commercial fiction I could find. I spent years in my doctoral work poring over GREAT LITERATURE, but when it came to sitting down to writing a bestseller, I had very little understanding of the nuts and bolts of what makes for a compelling plot or engaging characters (arguably, I still don’t, but like everyone else, I’m a WIP). Eventually I stumbled upon Donald Maass’s Writing the Breakout Novel, and there, I found the best piece of writing advice I’ve ever read or read since. The gist is this: ask yourself, “What is the worst thing that could happen right now?” And then you write exactly that.

In the story of America, as unstable and rocky as such a narrative is and has been, it seems our plot has turned. The worst has happened. All of us who are in the business of storytelling can see all the signs of a grand design involving a great fall, the dark night of the soul, the darkness before the dawn. Yet,such tropes speak to a hero’s journey, where eventually the chosen one will rise up, smote the enemy, and make things right again. As the days go on, though, and the news from Washington grows more and more terrifying, it’s difficult to see how that narrative could be possible. For those of who are in the business of writing commercial fiction, especially for those of us writing romance, we might try to grasp onto a Frodo, a Katniss, a Clare Fraser, a Harry Potter, but increasingly these characters’ plots seem, well, like the fantasies they’ve always been.

Glancing over my twitter feed, I see writers, like me, stunted by writer’s block, paralyzed in front of their laptops, hindered with anxiety and depression. The worlds we built in our heads are crumbling, and what’s left feels like the backdrop of Beckett’s Endgame, wherein the actors recite snippets of long lost dreams over and over again, grasping at something lost. Something they can barely remember and it wouldn’t matter if they did. Writing is hard, but writing in an age of uncertainty and anxiety makes it feel almost impossible.

After the election, I talked to my father. He’s also an artist–a composer–and he offered up this advice (please imagine his Mississippi accent. It works better that way).

“Colleen,” he said. “Look at this man. Look at him. Sooner or later, he’s gonna fuck up. He’s gonna fuck up! And these four years will be a blip in the history of America. Go write your stories. Go write your stories because he’s gonna fuck up.”

Something in these words signaled a turning point for me in my post-election grief, and I’ve been trying to sort it out. Perhaps it has something to do with the juxtaposition between our POETUS’s ineptitude and my own unwavering belief in myself, my ability to do great things, to prevail. Trump will fuck up, but I don’t have to. I don’t have to make these four years about him. I don’t know if a great hero or heroine will emerge from these ashes, but one thing I do know about purveyors of bigotry, violence, nepotism, fascism, and greed is that they tend not to have happy endings. Perhaps not in one generation or the next, but eventually. Villains fuck up. You might not find that chapter in Maass’s book. But villains fuck up. Bigly.

Today, I saw a writer who expressed feeling so deeply pained and anxious about the current political state of things, but she felt it would be “cowardice” to leave America. It’s in these moments I think of writers who chose exile over direct political engagement like James Baldwin or James Joyce. James Joyce chose to flee Ireland for the Continent in the heat of the Irish Revolution so he could pursue his writing career. Can you imagine? And yet, he  went on to write some of the greatest modern literature of the 20th century.

Reading through this writer’s tweets, I recalled a poem called Station Island by Seamus Heaney. Over the course of the poem, several ghosts visit Heaney who, himself, is haunted by his decision whether or not to leave Northern Ireland during the Troubles. Heaney had been very active in literary political activist groups, most notably the Field Day collective. Riddled with guilt and anxiety, at the end of the poem, Heaney visits the last station and the ghost of James Joyce confronts him. Joyce tells him:

‘Your obligation
is not discharged by any common rite.
What you do you must do on your own.

The main thing is to write
for the joy of it. Cultivate a work-lust
that imagines its haven like your hands at night

dreaming the sun in the sunspot of a breast.
You are fasted now, light-headed, dangerous.
Take off from here. And don’t be so earnest,

so ready for the sackcloth and the ashes.
Let go, let fly, forget.
You’ve listened long enough. Now strike  your note.’

What Joyce (vis-a-vis Heaney) is saying here is there is no “common rite” to being an artist, meaning that there are no rules to this gig. The only obligation is to writing and to cultivating that “work-lust” for it. Heaney has listened to the many ghosts and speakers at Station Island, but now he has to take all that and go forward and “strike [his] note.” Joyce goes on to say:

‘The English language
belongs to us. You are raking at dead fires,

rehearsing the old whinges at your age.
That subject people stuff is a cod’s game,
infantile, like this peasant pilgrimage.

You lose more of yourself than you redeem
doing the decent thing. Keep at a tangent.
When they make the circle wide, it’s time to swim

out on your own and fill the element
with signatures on your own frequency,
echo-soundings, searches, probes, allurements,

elver-gleams in the dark of the whole sea.’

Basically what Joyce is telling Heaney is that following the rules and doing what is expected of him is keeping him from fulfilling his deeper artistic purpose: “You lose more of yourself than you redeem/doing the decent thing.” Writers need to swim out on their own, find their voices, keep seeking and searching. Like Heaney, part of that paralysis we might feel stems from having new boundaries hoisted upon us, new rules for the “politically-engaged writer,” obligations to speak up, but in ways that already seem prescribed for us. If we need to step away and find our more authentic voice, then that is what we need to do. Baldwin, Joyce, Heaney, and so many other writers learned that in their own time, and our generation under this autocrat will have to learn it anew.

This doesn’t mean that we can’t be both–politically engaged and creative–but that we need to forgive ourselves when we find ourselves needing to step away lest our writing becomes more slogans than seeking. More divisive than exploratory. After all, for many Americans in this generation we are in brand new territory without a map or even a light to guide us. If we need to go out on our own to create these new pathways, then perhaps, years from now, our children will inherit more than our fears and our anxieties. Maybe they’ll actually inherit a world worth saving.